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Write awesome CLIs!

It’s time to start writing kick ass CLIs instead of hacking scripts! 🙂 It’s a lot easier than you might think.

If you’re impatient just scroll to the bottom for a link to the code in Github. 🙂

All those scripts

I see a lot of scripts around, but they usually suffer from many of these problems:

  • Missing or bad error handling
  • Limited input validation
  • Clumsy parameter handling
  • No testing, so every change requires testing all input combinations. Not to mention different state on the hard drive.
  • Copy and paste code. It’s hard to re-use libraries in scripts, even though a lot exists.
  • Implicit dependencies to OS and OS packages

I’ve done way too much of this in my time, and I have felt the pain of maintaining 16k lines of Bash code (I know, stupid). So I started looking for something better…

What I wanted

Coming from the developer side of things I’m really used to making third party libraries do a lot of the heavy lifting for me. It felt really awkward that there were no proper way to do this when creating tools for the command line. So I set out to look for:

  • A good way to define the Command Line Interface
  • Proper error handling
  • Test frameworks to enable automated testing
  • A way to package everything together with dependencies

In addition; I really wanted to do some automated testing. I hate writing code without knowing instantly that it performs as I believe it does. You might be differently inclined. 😉

Solutions?

There are many ways of doing this, but the only ones I’ve been able to get some real experience with are Python and Java. I would really like to learn Go, but it’s usually not politically viable and would take some time to learn.

I did maintain and develop a CLI in Python for a good while. And I really like the Python  language and all the awesome third party libraries available. But I always found it lacking in the distribution part. We were under certain (networking) constraints, so downloading stuff from PyPi was NOT and option. It took quite a lot of hacking with Virtualenv and Pip to set up some kind of infrastructure that enabled us to distribute our CLI with it’s dependencies. YMMV. 🙂

But all these hoops we were jumping through with Python made me think about what is great about Java. The classpath. 😉 Yeah, I know, I know. You all hate the classpath. But that’s because it’s been abused by the Java EE vendors through all these years. It’s really quite awesome, just make sure you take full control of it.

Java with some help from friends (see the details further down) would let me package it all up and create a truly cross platform single binary with all dependencies included (JRE required)! It even starts fast! (Unless you overload it with all kinds of Spring+Hibernate stuff. That’s on you.). And even though it sounds like something a masochist would do; it is actually kick ass. Try it. 🙂

If you don’t do this in Java; use Docopt (available in many languages). You should write CLIs and keep your build tool simple (dependencies, versioning, packaging).  I’ve seen way too much tooling shoe horned into different build tools. Write CLIs for the stuff not related to building and use the right tool for the right task.

Test a Java CLI

If you just want to try how fast and easy it actually works (you’ll need a JRE on your path):

$ curl https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/122923/executable-json-util-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar > ~/bin/json-util && chmod u+x ~/bin/json-util
$ json-util
Usage:
  json-util animate me
  json-util say [--encrypt=] 

In case you did not catch that:

  • We downloaded a jar, and saved it as a regular binary and saved to ~/bin.
  • We executed it and didn’t give any parameters so it printed the help text.

It’s a really simple (and stupid) example, but to invoke some “real” functionality you can do:

$ json-util say "Hello blog!"
Hello blog!

$ json-util --encrypt=rot13 "Hello blog!"
Uryyb oybt!

Neat! Write the utils you need to be effective in a language you know, with the tooling you know (this util is created with Maven). And write some F-ing tests while you’re at it. 😉

Tell me more, tell me more…

The things that makes writing CLIs in Java fun, easy and robust is:

  • Java. 🙂 Alright, alright. Maybe not the best language for this stuff. But the new IO APIs and the Streams with Lambdas in Java 8 helps a lot. And it’s typed… If you’re into that kind of stuff. 🙂 You can of course do this in Groovy or anything else that runs on the JVM, but be aware that many of those languages takes some time to bootstrap and you’ll notice that every time you run the CLI.
  • Maven-shade-plugin. It packages your code together with all the dependencies to one binary.
  • Maven-really-executable-jars-plugin. It modifies the single jar with a zip-compliant header that lets you skip the “java -jar …” part of executing it every time.
  • Docopt-java. It makes writing, validating and parsing command line arguments extremely easy and fun.
  • Docopt-completion. Once you have your kick ass CLI, add some kick ass tab-completion. 😉

Show me code!

You can see an example of all of this (Java and Maven required) at: https://github.com/anderssv/executable-json-util .

Powerpoint presenters mode in VirtualBox

After switching to Linux as my main operating system I was expecting problems. Even though it has come far, it’s not really your granny’s operating system. 😉 I don’t use much Windows only software, but one of the problems was definitely going to be working with Powerpoint.

So I figured VirtualBox with Windows and Powerpoint would be a decent solution. And it has worked like a charm.

But I did miss presenters mode when doing the talks, and never really thought it would be possible. Until I discovered that you can change the number of displays associated with your VM. 🙂

It’s not without it’s quirks, but doable if you get used to it. So you can do:

  • Plug in your external monitor
  • Make sure the Linux settings are correct with resolution and placement
  • Make sure the VM isn’t started
  • Go into settings > Display on you VirtualBox VM
  • Set the VM to have 2 displays
  • Boot the VM
  • Go full screen with the VM
  • Configure windows settings to reflect multiple displays and resolution and position
  • Start PowerPoint and do F5 for presentation

It should work now. 🙂 Good luck with your presentation… 😉